Curriculum Vitae

ORCHID ID: 0000-0003-4163-8644

Work Address (CIW):                    Earth and Planets Laboratory

                                                             5251 Broad Branch Road, NW

                                                             Washington, DC  20015-1305

Work Telephone:                           202-478-8962

FAX:                                                   202-478-8901

E-mail                                                rhazen@carnegiescience.edu

Websites:                                          http://hazen.gl.ciw.edu
                                                             http://deepcarbon.net
                                                             http://dtdi.carnegiescience.edu
                                                             http://4d-workshop.net

Place of Birth:                                 Rockville Centre, NY

Citizenship:                                      USA

Date of Birth:                                   November 1, 1948

Marital Status:                                Married August 9, 1969 to Margaret Joan Hindle

Children:                                           Benjamin Hindle Hazen (b. June 18, 1976)

                                                            Elizabeth Brooke Hazen (b. September 1, 1978)

Education:

   Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.      1966-1970    B.S. Earth Science

   Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.      1970-1971    S.M. Earth Science

   Indiana University                        1969               Summer Field Geology

   Harvard University                       1971-1975    Ph.D. Mineralogy & Crystallography


 

 Employment History (Scientific Research and Education):

  • Senior Staff Scientist, Earth and Planets Laboratory (formerly the Geophysical Laboratory), Carnegie Institution for Science, 1978-
  • Executive Director and Founding PI, Deep Carbon Observatory, 2008-2019
  • Clarence Robinson Professor of Earth Sciences, George Mason Univ., 1989-2019
  • President, Robert & Margaret Hazen Foundation, 2008-
  • Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution, Department of Paleobiology, 2007-
  • President, Hazen Associates, Ltd., 1994-2007
  • Professional Trumpeter, 1965-2013
  • Visiting Researcher, Univ. California at Santa Barbara, Chemistry Department, 1987
  • Summer Faculty, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1978
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Geophysical Laboratory, 1976-1978
  • NATO Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Cambridge, Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, Cambridge, England, 1975-1976
  • Research Assistant and Teaching Fellow, Harvard, 1973-1975
  • Field Assistant, U. S. Geological Survey, Summers of 1970 and 1971
  • Curator of Geological Collections, M.I.T., 1967-1970
  • Laboratory Assistant, Isotopes, Inc., Westwood, NJ, Summer, 1967       

Professional Experience—Scientific Research and Education:

From 1971 to 1999 most of Robert Hazen’s scientific research focused on the close relationships between crystal structure and physical properties. He developed several high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray diffraction techniques and applied them to understanding effects of temperature and pressure on atomic arrangements, particularly in deep Earth environments – work summarized in Comparative Crystal Chemistry with Larry Finger (Wiley, 1982) and the edited volume High-Temperature and High-Pressure Crystal Chemistry (Mineralogical Society of America, 2000). He studied a wide variety of materials, including lunar minerals, ceramics, ferroelectrics, solidified gases, and organometallics. Hazen led the team of Carnegie scientists who first isolated and identified several new high-temperature superconductor structure types. Some of these studies are summarized in Breakthrough: The Race for the Superconductor (1988), The New Alchemists (1994), and The Diamond Makers (1999).

 In 1996, thanks to a new perspective on science research opportunities fostered by teaching integrated science courses at George Mason University (see below), Hazen began research on high-pressure organic synthesis and the varied roles of minerals in processes that led to the origins of life. Working with a team of scientists at the Carnegie Institution, he developed a proposal to join NASA’s Astrobiology Institute to study physical and chemical environments of high-pressure hydrothermal systems and their possible role in prebiotic organic synthesis and the origins of life. Research projects included studies of mineral-mediated organic synthesis, the role of minerals in stabilizing organic compounds, the nature of mineral-molecule surface interactions in aqueous solutions, and the chiral selectivity of biomolecules on enantiomeric mineral surfaces. He has also been active in the development of micro-analytical tools for paleobiology. Some of this work is summarized in Genesis: The Scientific Quest for Life’s Origins (National Academy Press, 2005) and in The Story of Earth (Viking, 2012). The latter book served as the basis for an episode of NOVA (WGBH-TV), “Life’s Rocky Start,” which first aired in January 2016.

 In 2006 Robert Hazen began studies in the changing diversity and distribution of minerals in the near-surface environments of Earth and other terrestrial planets and moons, a field that he called “mineral evolution.” Earth’s mineralogical history is thereby divided into stages, each of which saw significant changes in the diversity and distribution of near-surface mineralogy. Principal findings include the realization that different planets and moons achieve different stages of mineral evolution. Furthermore, as many as 60% of known mineral species on Earth probably could not have appeared prior to the origin and evolution of life. Recent mineral evolution studies reveal significant correlations between Earth’s near-surface mineralogy and the supercontinent cycle, changes in atmospheric and ocean chemistry, and the emergence of the terrestrial biosphere. Follow-up studies have focused on the mineral evolution of specific elements (e.g., U, Hg, Mo, Li, Be, B, and others), tabulations of probable minerals during Earth’s Hadean Eon, and a consideration of minerals of the “Anthropocene Epoch.”

These studies led in the Summer of 2014 to recognition that mineral diversity-distribution data display many of the trends known for biological ecosystems. For example, mineral distributions conform to Large Number of Rare Event (LNRE) frequency distributions. LNRE statistical models lead to predictions of the type, age, and localities of Earth’s “missing” minerals—species that occur on Earth but have not yet been discovered and described. These new methods, applied to large and growing mineralogical data resources and coupled with powerful analytical and visualization methods, are transforming aspects of mineralogy from a descriptive to a predictive science. Hazen is also active in the study of emergent systems (especially their relevance to origins of life), the quantification of complex systems (through the formalism of “functional information”), and the evolution of complex systems under selective pressures.

Mineral evolution and mineral ecology studies are predicated on comprehensive, open-access data resources. Consequently, Hazen and colleagues have been active in building mineral data resources and enlisting a variety of analytical and visualization methods, including mineral network analysis, cluster analysis, and affinity analysis – work that increasingly engages young aspiring scientists from grade school to undergraduates (e.g., see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2n12fUd7654).

Most recently, Hazen and Shaunna Morrison have introduced and are now developing an “evolutionary system of mineralogy”—one that amplifies the existing mineral classification system by considering the formation mechanisms of condensed natural phases as a central guiding principle in discriminating natural mineral kinds. This approach, which employs mineral networks as a tool for analysis and visualization, facilitates exploration of planetary evolution through the multi-dimensional analysis of non-ideal attributes of minerals. The evolutionary system is being developed in a series of more than 20 chapter-length publications.


 

 The Deep Carbon Observatory

From 2008 to 2019, Hazen was founding Principal Investigator and Executive Director of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO), a 10-year effort to achieve fundamental advances in understanding the chemical, physical, and biological roles of carbon in Earth (http://deepcarbon.net). The DCO ultimately engaged more than 1,200 collaborators, most of them early-career, from 55 countries with total funding from governmental, corporate, and private sources exceeding $600 million. In addition to his studies of carbon mineralogy through Earth history, Hazen played a significant role in the integration and synthesis of all of DCO’s diverse research projects, which collectively addressed the quantities, movements, forms, and origins of carbon in Earth. This work is synthesized in his book: Symphony in C: Carbon and the Evolution of (Almost) Everything (W.W. Norton, 2019). 


 

Science Education

In January 1989, Hazen joined the faculty of George Mason University as the Clarence J. Robinson Professor of Earth Sciences. This opportunity arose from his interest in engaging students from diverse backgrounds, especially students from under-represented groups who are not science majors, in the natural sciences. Science is central to all our lives, and a firm grounding in scientific literacy informs our citizens in a broad range of topics related to health, environment, resources, business, and education. Science is also an engine of discovery, and represents a great human adventure. Accordingly, he developed undergraduate courses in scientific literacy (with Prof. James Trefil), scientific ethics, symmetry in art and science, and the image of the scientist in popular culture, as well as graduate seminars in astrobiology, the origins of life, and geoinformatics. Hazen’s writings with James Trefil include the bestselling Science Matters: Achieving Scientific Literacy (Doubleday, 1990; 2nd edition, 2010) and The Sciences: An Integrated Approach (Wiley, 1st edition,1993; 9th edition, forthcoming). He has been active in national efforts to reform science education and has presented lectures and workshops on undergraduate science curricula at more than 100 colleges and universities. He contributed as a writer for the National Science Education Standards, and served on the Executive Board of the National Research Council’s Committee on Science Education, as a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Committee for the Public Understanding of Science and Technology, and on the National Academy of Sciences’ committees to write Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science (1998) and to revise the influential pamphlet, Science and Creationism (3rd edition, 2007). His work in education resulted in his receiving the Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award in 2011.

As part of George Mason University and the Carnegie Institution’s ongoing educational activities, Robert Hazen has taught ~8,000 undergraduate students, most of them women and under-represented minorities. He has also supervised approximately 80 young scientists as Undergraduate Interns, Predoctoral Fellows, and Postdoctoral Fellows. In addition, his teaching reaches a much wider audience through four popular lecture series distributed by The Great Courses – a cumulative total of 96 hours of recordings that are used widely for home schooling, retirement communities, prison populations, and a diverse general audience.


Popular Writing in History and Science

Hazen, frequently in collaboration with his wife Margaret Hindle Hazen, has written several books and many related articles on aspects of the history of American science and society. Previous works include American Geological Literature and North American Geology (a bibliography and review, respectively, of early American geological research), Wealth Inexhaustible (a history of American mining and other mineral industries), and The Poetry of Geology (a collection of geological poetry of the 18th and 19th centuries). The Music Men, written with Margaret Hazen, won the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for its examination of technological and social aspects of the American brass band movement. The Hazens also wrote Keepers of the Flame (1990), a cultural and technological history of fire in early America, published by Princeton University Press. The Breakthrough: The Race for the Superconductor (Summit, 1988) is Hazen’s popular account of the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity, while The New Alchemists: Breaking through the Frontiers of High-Pressure Research (Times Books, 1994) and The Diamond Makers (Cambridge University Press, 1999), explore the history of diamond making and other high-pressure applications.

 In 1990 Hazen, with physicist James Trefil, wrote Science Matters: Achieving Scientific Literacy (Doubleday, 1991; second edition 2009), which now has more than 250,000 copies in print in a dozen languages. That volume proposes a definition of scientific literacy based on overarching scientific principles. In conjunction with the book Hazen has appeared on NBC’s The Today Show, CBS’s Nightwatch, NOVA (WGBH, Boston), and numerous other national and local TV and radio programs. Hazen also contributed articles and editorials to Newsweek, The New York Times Magazine, Chronicle of Higher Education, The Scientist, and other periodicals. Hazen and Trefil have written three undergraduate textbooks that amplify these themes, The Sciences: An Integrated Approach (Wiley, 8th edition, 2015), The Physical Sciences (Wiley, 1996), and Physics Matters (Wiley, 2003). The Sciences also served as the basis for Hazen’s 60-lecture video and audio course, “The Joy of Science,” which is distributed nationally as part of the Great Courses series (The Teaching Company, Chantilly, Virginia). Why Aren’t Black Holes Black: Unanswered Questions at the Frontiers of Science (Anchor, 1998), written with Maxine Singer, adopts the style of Science Matters, but focuses on the most compelling unanswered questions that drive today’s science. Genesis: The Scientific Quest for Life’s Origin (Joseph Henry Press, 2005), with a companion 24-lecture series, “The Origins of Life” (The Teaching Company, 2005), surveys the origins-of-life research field.

The Story of Earth (Viking, 2012), which examines more than 4.5 billion years of Earth history framed in the context of the coevolving geosphere and biosphere, was named a semi-finalist in the 2013 Royal Society (London) Science Book Prize, a finalist in the 2013 Phi Beta Kappa Science Book Prize, and one of Kirkus Reviews “top 25 non-fiction books” of 2012. The book, and the thematic subject of mineral evolution, was the basis of an episode of NOVA, “Life’s Rocky Start” (WGBH TV, Boston). The book has also been developed as a 48-lecture video/audio course in the Great Courses series, published by The Teaching Company (2013). Hazen’s latest book, Symphony in C: Carbon and the Evolution of (Almost) Everything (W.W. Norton, 2019) surveys the multi-faceted science of carbon and it’s influences on the geosphere and biosphere.


The Hazen Collection of Trilobites

 From 1968 to 2014, Robert and Margaret Hazen amassed one of the largest collections in private hands of trilobites (fossil arthropods from the Paleozoic Era). They collected many of the specimens in Europe, Africa, and North America. Beginning in 2007, most of this collection was transferred by donation to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. Approximately 100 specimens of the 2000-piece collection are on display at the Museum, including in the Hall of Ocean Life. An additional collection of more than 300 specimens was donated to the University of Arizona Mineral Museum and formed the core of the exhibit “Meet the Trilobites: Arizona’s First Inhabitants.” These specimens also form the basis of recent taphonomic studies of preserved biomolecules that have demonstrated the preservation of chitin byproducts in specimens as old as lower Middle Cambrian (~500 Ma).


 Employment History (Professional Music)

Robert Hazen played symphonic trumpet professionally from 1966 until his retirement in November 2016. He was a tenured member of the National Gallery Orchestra (1977-2010), the National Philharmonic (2004-2010), and the Washington Bach Consort (1977-2010). He studied in Boston with Natalo Paella, Andre Come, and Armando Ghitalla, and in Washington with Steven Hendrickson, Adel Sanchez, Emerson Head, and Chris Gekker. He appeared as soloist with the Boston Symphony Esplanade Orchestra, the National Gallery Orchestra, the Washington Handel Festival Orchestra, the Washington Chamber Symphony, the National Gallery Orchestra, the Emmanuel Music Orchestra (Boston), and on BBC TV in England in a live performance of Henry Purcell’s Sonata in D. Hazen has given many recitals in the United States and Great Britain, including the Busch-Reisinger and Gardner Museums in Boston, the Smithsonian and Corcoran Museums in Washington, and Kings College and St. Johns College in Cambridge England. In 1998 he appeared as soloist at the Kennedy Center with the Washington Chamber Symphony, for which he played 2nd trumpet from its founding in 1977 until its demise in 2003.

In 1967 he co-founded the Cambridge Symphonic Brass Ensemble, a brass quintet that thrives to this day. They performed hundreds of concerts and recitals throughout New England, including the first performances of the Christmas Revels at Sanders Theater in Cambridge, the first Ascension Day brass concerts from the Tower of the Busch-Reisinger Museum on the Harvard University campus, and many concerts at the Castle Hill Music Festival.

He has performed as an extra trumpeter with numerous ensembles in Europe and North America, including the Boston and National Symphonies; Orchestre de Paris; the New York, Boston, Washington, and Metropolitan Operas; and the Jeoffrey, American, Washington, Baltimore, Kirov, and Royal Ballets. His frequent appearances with National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) include performances with Mistislav Rostropovich, Erich Leinsdorf, Antal Dorati, and Leonard Slatkin. He performed with the NSO on their 2004 national tour, including performances at Carnegie Hall.

He continued to perform on historic instruments until 2012 with such ensembles as the Washington Bach Consort, the Folger Consort, the Handel Choir of Baltimore, the Cathedral Choral Society, the Wolf Trap Opera, and the Washington Bach Sinfonia. Hazen has recorded on both modern and historic instruments with ensembles on DDG, Pro Arte, New World, Nonesuch, Smithsonian, and AMI records.

Robert and Margaret Hazen are authorities on the history of bands in America. They assembled one of the largest collections of brass band ephemera in the world and they wrote The Music Men: An Illustrated History of Brass Bands in America (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1987), which won the 1989 ASCAP Deems Taylor Award. They subsequently wrote the script and appeared in a documentary film on the history of bands, produced by SIRS Inc. and shown on PBS TV. The Hazen Collection of Brass Band Ephemera is now preserved in the archives of the Smithsonian Institution. More than 100 historic brass instruments collected by Robert Hazen are also in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and the National Music Museum (Vermillion, South Dakota).

Robert and Margaret Hazen performed as semi-professional Renaissance dancers from 1972 to 1984. They were members of the Cambridge Court Dancers (Boston) and the Dupont Circle Consortium (Washington) in numerous venues, including the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Cloisters, Dumbarton Oaks, the Folger Theatre, and the Smithsonian Institution.

Robert Hazen is also an amateur cellist. He plays regularly with Margaret Hazen (a violist) and a growing circle of musical friends. They completed their first Beethoven string quartet cycle in 2012 and are now engaged in a Shostakovich cycle.

Professional music highlights include:

  •    Founding Member, Cambridge Symphonic Brass Ensemble, 1967-1975
  •    Solo Trumpet, Emmanuel Bach Orchestra, Boston, 1973-1975; Guest soloist 2006-2008
  •    Founding Member and 2nd Trumpet, Washington Chamber Symphony, 1977-2003 
  •    Founding Member and 2nd Trumpet, Washington Chamber Orchestra, 1980-1988; European tour, 1986  
  •    Member, National Gallery Orchestra, 1977-2010
  •    Member, Washington Bach Consort, 1977-2010; German tour 2000
  •    Founding Member, National Chamber Orchestra, 1979-1985
  •    Founding Member, and Board of Directors, National Philharmonic, 2004-2016 
  •    Alternate Musician, National Symphony Orchestra, 1978-2005; national tour, 2004
  •    Member, Filene Center (Wolf Trap and Wolf Trap Opera) Orchestra, 1977-2006
  •    Freelance Union musician, Boston and Washington, 1971-2016   

 Academic Honors: Fellowships, Scholarships, and Named Lectureships

  • Named #2 on AcademicInfluence.com list of the most influential Earth scientists (2021)
    https://academicinfluence.com/articles/people/influential-earth-scientists-today?utm_source=newswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=2021_q2_0422_er_earthday&utm_content=text
  • John Templeton Foundation, Ideas Challenge Essay Award winner (2020)
  • Dialogues of Discovery Lecturer, Dartmouth College (2020). Watch this lecture on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=giu0HuIbtBs
  • Woodford-Eckis Lectureship, Pomona College (2020)
  • University Commencement Speaker, Old Dominion University, Invited (event cancelled by Covid 19 concerns; 2020)
  • Elected Foreign Member, Russian Academy of Sciences (2019)
  • Elected Fellow, American Geophysical Union (2019)
  • Petroleum Museum (Midland TX), Arlen Edgar Distinguished Lecture (2019)
  • Janelia Farms (Warrenton VA), Dialogues of Discovery Lecture (2019)
  • Science Sunday Lecture, Ohio State University (2019): Watch this lecture on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvsRXWxOX-w
  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Science Friday Lecture (2018). Watch this lecture on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oiAVmgLPpY
  • Outstanding Student Paper Award, AGU Annual Meeting (2018; served as mentor)
  • Frontiers Lecturer, University of Utah (2017). Watch this lecture on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BX9-d9Rp9dM
  • Elected Honorary Membership, Russian Mineralogical Society (2017)
  • Vienna Museum of Natural History, Guest of Honor at opening of their “Mineral Evolution” exhibit (2017)
  • The Chauncey Holmes Lecture, Syracuse University (2017)
  • Roebling Medal, Mineralogical Society of America (2016)
  • The Morgan Lecturer, Appalachian State University (2016)
  • Elected Fellow, Geological Society of America (2015)
  • Austrian Academy of Sciences, Mineral Evolution symposium held in his honor (2015)
  • The Leibnitz Lecturer, University of Potsdam (2015)
  • The Ingerson Lecturer of the Geochemical Society (2014)
  • Foster-Hewitt Lecturer, Lehigh University (2014)
  • Elected Fellow, Geochemical Society (2014)
  • Plenary Keynote Lecturer, Society of Economic Geology (2014)
  • Plenary Keynote Lecturer, American Society of Cell Biology (2014)
  • Keynote Lecturer, Gordon Research Conference on Biomineralization (2014)
  • Keynote Lecturer (2 sessions), International Mineralogical Association (2014)
  • Capital Science Lecturer, Carnegie Institution (2014)
  • Arthur Storke Lecturer, Columbia University (2013)
  • Finalist, Phi Beta Kappa Science Book Prize (2013)
  • Semi-Finalist, Royal Society (London) Science Book Prize (2013)
  • Nobel Symposium Lecturer, Royal Academy, Stockholm, Sweden (2013)
  • Linus Pauling Lecturer, Portland, Oregon (2013)
  • Qualline Lecture, University of Texas (2013)
  • Naff Symposium Lecture, University of Kentucky (2013)
  • Plenary Lecturer, Goldschmidt Conference (2013)
  • Condon Lecture, Oregon State University (2012)
  • Moore Lecture, Oregon State University (2012)
  • Vetlesen and Fish Lectures, University of Rhode Island (2012)
  • Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award (2011)
  • Linnaeus Prize and Lecture, Uppsala, Sweden (2011)
  • Keynote Lecturer, Deep Carbon Cycle Workshop, Sendai, Japan (2011)
  • Keynote Lecturer, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Annual Meeting, Washington DC (2011)
  • Distinguished Scientist Lecture, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX (2010)
  • Keynote Lecturer, Origins of Life Symposium, Groningen, Netherlands (2010)
  • Keynote Lecturer, Synthetic Biology Symposium, Vienna, Austria (2010)
  • Pardee Symposium Organizer, Geological Society of America, Denver, CO (2010)
  • Keynote Lecturer, International Mineralogical Association, Budapest, Hungary (2010)
  • The Bradley Lecture, Geological Society of Washington (2010)
  • Mineralogical Society of America, Distinguished Public Service Medal (2009)
  • The Baldwin Lecture, Miami University of Ohio (2009)
  • The Charter Lecturer, University of Georgia (2009)
  • “Mineral evolution” selected by Science News as a “science story of the year” (2008)
  • Sigma Xi, Distinguished Public Lecturer (2008-2010)
  • National Science Foundation, Biosciences Directorate, Distinguished Public Lecturer (2007)
  • Elected Chair, Gordon Research Conference on the Origin of Life (2007-2008)
  • The Robert Reed Lecturer, The Ohio State University (2007)
  • The Elsasser Lecturer, The Johns Hopkins University (2007)
  • The Darwin Lecturer, Northwestern University (2007)
  • The Sokol Lecturer, Montclair State University (2007)
  • Invited Editor of Elements: Volume 1, #3, “Genesis” (2005); Volume 6, #1 “Mineral evolution” (2010)
  • Mineralogical Society of America, Elected Vice President (2003-2004) and President (2004-2005); Distinguished Lecturer (2003-2004)
  • “Life’s Rocky Start” selected for Best Science Writing of 2001, Natalie Angier, Editor. (2002)
  • Distinguished Lecturer, Smithsonian Institution Senate of Scientists (2001)
  • Elizabeth Wood Science Writing Award, American Crystallographic Association (1998)
  • Physics Today 50th Anniversary Essay Contest, Honorable Mention (1998)
  • The Dibner Lecturer, Smithsonian Institution (1996)
  • Educational Press Association Award, for the Time magazine essay “Why my kids hate science” (1992)
  • ASCAP Deems Taylor Award, for The Music Men (with Margaret Hazen, 1989)
  • The Ipatief Prize of the American Chemical Society (1986), “To recognize outstanding chemical experimental work in the field of high pressure.”
  • The Mineralogical Society of America Award (1982) “For outstanding contributions to the chemistry of crystals at high pressure.”
  • Geophysical Laboratory Postdoctoral Fellowship (1976-1978)
  • NATO Postdoctoral Fellowship in Science (1975-1976)
  • The Bowdoin Prize (Harvard University essay award), Honorable mention (1974)
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship (1971-1974)
  • Ancient and Honorable Artillery Society Prize for history, MIT (1973)
  • United States Geological Survey Junior Field Assistant (1970)
  • Elected President, MIT Geology Club (1969-1970)
  • Phi Lambda Upsilon (National Chemistry Honorary), MIT (1969)
  • Baton Society, MIT music honorary (1969)
  • Elected President, MIT Symphony Orchestra (1968-1970)
  • Outstanding Musician Award, New York State Invitational, Fredonia, NY (1966)
  • New Jersey All-State Orchestra and All-State Band (1965-1966)
  • The Harvard Prize for the outstanding underclassman, Ridgewood High School (1965)

 Professional and Committee Memberships

  • Mineralogical Society of America (MSA Award and Life Fellow, 1982; Program Committee, 1978-80; MSA Award Committee, 1983; Associate Editor, 1983-87; Councilor, 1987-90; Mineral Physics Representative, 1990-94; Special Editor, 1997-98; Nominating Committee, 2002; Vice President, 2003-04; President, 2004-05; Past President, 2005-06; Chairman Benefactors Committee, 2005-2008; Distinguished Public Service Award, 2009; Member (2011-2015) and Founding Chairman, Data Science Committee; Roebling Medal, 2016; Distinguished Public Service Award Committee, 2019-.
  • International Society for the Study of the Origins of Life (Elected to the Executive Council, 2011-2014)
  • American Geophysical Union (Elected Fellow, 2019; Mineral Physics Committee Executive Panel, 1984-88; Macelwane Award Committee, 1986-88; Journal of Geophysical Research Associate Editor, 1985-87; Editor of “Mineral Physics News,” 1984-1987; History of Geophysics Committee; Sullivan Award Committee, 1999-2002)
  • National Research Council (Committee on K-12 Science Education and Executive Committee, 1995-2001; National Science Education Standards, writing team; Working Group on Teaching Evolution and coauthor Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science; writing team for 3rd edition of Evolution and Creationism, 2004-2007; Physics and Chemistry of Earth Materials Steering Committee, 1985-87; Board of Earth Sciences Committee on Education)
  • National Academy of Sciences, Science and Entertainment Exchange, Advisory Board, 2008-2016
  • National Science Foundation, Biosciences Directorate Advisory Board, 2009-2012; Distinguished Lecturer, 2012 and 2017.
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (Fellow, 1996; Committee for the Public Understanding of Science, 2001-2008)
  • Geological Society of America (Fellow, 2015; Pardee Symposium Chair, 2012)
  • Geochemical Society (Plenary Lecturer, 2012; Fellow, 2013)
  • American Chemical Society (Ipatief Prize, 1986)
  • American Institute of Physics (Andrew Gemant Award Committee, 1997-2003)
  • Geological Society of Washington (Bradley Lecturer, 2011)
  • Sigma Xi (Distinguished Lecturer, 2008-2010)
  • History of Earth Science Society
  • National Committee for the History of Geology (Executive Committee and Secretary, 1978-1983)
  • International Committee for the History of Geology (Corresponding Member, 1983-1989)
  • International Federation of Musicians, AFL-CIO (1971-)

Advisory Board Memberships

  • Rruff.info mineralogical database, International Advisory Board
  • Mindat.org mineralogical database, International Advisory Board
  • Earth Life Sciences Initiative, Tokyo Tech, Japan, International Advisory Board, 2012-
  • National Science Foundation, Biosciences Directorate, Advisory Board, 2009-2012
  • Earth & Sky (National Public Radio), 1999-2013
  • National Science Resources Center (Smithsonian and NAS), 1992-1996
  • NOVA (WGBH TV, Boston) Advisory Board, 1993-
  • California State University-Wide Science and Math Collaborative, 1993-1995
  • The Carnegie Council (Washington, DC), 1993-2010
  • George Mason University, Institute of the Arts, Core Faculty, 1994-2002
  • Winding Your Way through DNA Project (UCSF), 1994-1996
  • Idaho State Science Education Project, 1995-1996
  • Virginia Urban Corridor Science Collaborative, 1995-1997
  • Advisory Board, Encyclopedia Americana, 1995-2011
  • National Philharmonic, Board of Directors, 2003-2011
  • Hazen has also served as advisor to state science education groups in Connecticut, Idaho, New York, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia.

 

Grants for Research (Robert Hazen is PI unless otherwise noted):

  • “The Deep Carbon Observatory Secretariat: Years 9 and 10,” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, (7/1/2018-12/31/2019), $1,400,000.
  • “The 4D Workshop: Deep-Time Data-Driven Discovery and the Evolution of Earth.” Grants from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation ($115,000), NASA ($50,000), the Moore Foundation ($20,000), Earth-Life Science Institute, Japan ($20,000), the United States Geological Survey ($8,000), and the International Union of Crystallography ($4500).
  • “Chance, necessity, and the origins of life,” Templeton Foundation (1/1/2017-12/31/2019), $400,000.
  • “Carbon Mineral Evolution: Deep Carbon, Deep Time, and the Co-evolution of the Geosphere and Biosphere,” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (11/1/2016-12/31/2018; R.T. Downs, PI), $230,000.
  • “The Deep Carbon Observatory Secretariat: Years 8 and 9,” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (7/1/2016-6/30/2018), $2,200,000.
  •  “Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Hadean and Archean Geochemical and Mineralogical Environments,” Simons Foundation (4/1/2016-3/31/2017), $25,000.
  • “Co-evolution of the Geosphere and Biosphere,” Keck Foundation, (1/1/2015-12/31/2017), $1,400,000.
  • “The Deep Carbon Observatory Secretariat: Years 6 and 7,” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, (7/1/2014-6/30/2016), $2,250,000.
  • “Integrative and Synthetic Research for the Deep Carbon Observatory” (11/1/2013-10/31/2016), $400,000.
  • “Mineralogical Characterization of Methane Hydrate,” Carnegie Canada Foundation, (11/1/2012-10/31/2013), $8,300.
  • “The Deep Carbon Observatory Secretariat: Years 4 and 5,” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, (7/1/2012-6/30/2014), $2,250,000.
  • “Deep Carbon Instrumentation II,” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, (4/1/2012-12/31/2013), $1,150,000.
  • “Collaborative Research: An Interdisciplinary Study of Chiral Adsorption on Mineral Surfaces,” NSF (9/15/2010-9/14-2013), with Dimitri Sverjensky (Johns Hopkins) as co-PI, $610,000.
  • “Deep Carbon Instrumentation,” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, (6/1/2010-12/31/2010), $900,000.
  • “The Deep Carbon Observatory,” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. (7/1/2009-6/30/2012). $4,000,000.
  • “Astrobiological Connections,” NASA Astrobiology Institute, (2/15/2009-2/14/2015). $6,414,585. (George Cody, PI).
  • “The Deep Carbon Cycle: A Proposal for Interdisciplinary Study.” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, 2007-2009. $400,000.
  • “Proposal to NASA-NAI for Support of the 2008 Origin of Life Gordon Research Conference.” NASA Astrobiology Institute, 2007-2008. $30,000.
  • “Investigating the Biosphere’s Roots in Deep Earth Geochemistry.” Keck Foundation, 2007-2009, with M. Fogel, PI, and 4 others. $1,200,000.
  • “Astrobiological Pathways: From the Interstellar Medium, Through Planetary Systems, to the Emergence and Detection of Life,” NASA Astrobiology Institute, Approximately $6,300,000 for 2003-2008, with Sean Solomon and others.
  • “Collaborative Research: An Interdisciplinary Study of Chiral Adsorption on Mineral Surfaces,” NASA and NSF co-funded, 2007-2010, with Dimitri Sverjensky (Johns Hopkins) as co-PI, $570,000
  • “Signs of Life: A search for γ-sulfur in Canadian hot springs.” Turner Foundation, $8,000 for 2005-2008.
  • “A Multidisciplinary Study of Selective Adsorption of Chiral Molecules on Mineral Surfaces,” NSF.  $95,714 for 2003-2004, with Andrew Steele.
  • “High-Pressure Crystal Chemistry of Earth Materials,” NSF.  $270,000 for 1999-2002, with Charles Prewitt and Hexiong Yang.
  • “Hydrothermal systems: Physical, chemical, and biological evolution and cosmic environments,”  NASA Astrobiology Institute, Approximately $3,200,000 for 1998-2003, with Sean Soloman and others.
  • “High-pressure, hydrothermal organic synthesis,” NSF Life in Extreme Environments (LExEn) and SGER programs, $100,000 for 1997-1999, with George Cody and Russell Hemley.
  • “Wonderful Life: Isotope micropaleontology of the Burgess Shale,” Turner Foundation, $30,000 for 1997-1999; $5,000 extension for 2001-2002.
  • “Mineral catalyzed biochemical reactions in high-pressure hydrothermal environments,” NSF SGER Program, $10,000 for 1997-1998.
  • “Acquisition of a four-circle single-crystal diffractometer with a CCD detector,” NSF Division of Earth Sciences, $161,000 for 1997-2000, with Larry Finger and others.
  • “High-Pressure Crystal Chemistry of Earth Materials.”  National Science Foundation grant awards for 1990-1993 ($240,000) and 1993-1998 ($380,000), with Larry Finger.
  • “Mineral Energetics: Relationships among structure, bonding, thermochemical properties and elastic properties of minerals in the system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O.” National Science Foundation grant awards for 1986-1987 ($54,600), for 1988-1990 ($140,000), with Larry Finger.
  • “Mineral Energetics: Relationships among structure, bonding, thermochemical properties and elastic properties of minerals in the system BeO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O.” National Science Foundation Grant Awards for 1984-1986 ($250,000), with Larry Finger.
  • “Mineral Physics: relationships between physical properties and crystal structure” National Science Foundation Grant Awards for 1978-1979 ($80,000.00), for 1980-1981 ($120,000.00), for 1982-1984 ($158,000.00), and approved for 1985-1988 ($185,000.00) with Larry W. Finger.
  • “Mineral Physics Conference” National Science Foundation Grant Award for travel and other expenses associated with this conference, held at Airlie House, VA, October, 1977.  ($13,000.00) with Charles T. Prewitt.
  • “Origin and history of returned lunar samples and selected meteorites” NASA grant award for 1978-1979 ($55,000.00) with Peter M. Bell and David Mao.
  • Robert Hazen was also on the scientific staff of the Center for High-Pressure Research, funded by the National Science Foundation, 1990-2002, Charles T. Prewitt, Principal Investigator. 

 Published Abstracts and Invited Lectures:

Approximately 240 abstracts have been published in proceedings of professional societies since 1971. Invited/plenary/keynote lectures have been presented at meetings of the following societies:

  • AIRAPT (High-pressure research society)
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science
  • American Chemical Society
  • American Crystallographic Society
  • American Geophysical Union
  • American Physical Society
  • American Society for Cytopathology
  • American Society of Cell Biology
  • Biophysical Society
  • Coast Geological Society (Santa Barbara, CA)
  • COMPRES
  • Dallas Mineral Symposium
  • Deep Carbon Observatory
  • Earth-Life Science Institute (Tokyo, Japan)
  • European Mineralogical Association
  • Geochemical Society
  • Geological Society of America
  • Geological Society of Washington
  • Gordon Research Conference (High Pressure)
  • Gordon Research Conference (Origin of Life)
  • Gordon Research Conference (Biomineralization)
  • Gordon Research Conference (Geobiology)
  • Industrial Diamond Association
  • International Mineralogical Association
  • Japan Geosciences Union
  • Kavli Futures Workshop
  • Mineralogical Society (Great Britain)
  • Mineralogical Society of America
  • Philosophical Society of Washington
  • Potomac Geophysical Society
  • Russian Mineralogical Society
  • Society for Economic Geology

 Invited lectures have been delivered at colleges, universities, and national laboratories in 38 states and 19 countries on 5 continents:

 University of Alaska (Anchorage)
 University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)                                  Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ)
 University of California (Santa Barbara, CA)                University of California (Berkeley, CA)
University of California (Los Angeles, CA)                      Stanford University (Stanford, CA)                    
California State University (Fresno, CA)                         CalTech (Pasadena, CA)
Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, CA)                     Beckman Center (Irvine, CA)
NASA Ames Research Lab (Moffett Field, CA)               University of California (Santa Cruz, CA)
Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles, CA)         University of Southern California (Los Angeles)
Coast Geological Society (Ventura, CA)                           Scripps (La Jolla, CA)
 University of Colorado (Boulder, CO)                             Colorado School of Mines (Golden)
 University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT)                             Yale University (New Haven, CT)
Central Connecticut State Univ. (New Britain, CT)           Fairfield University (Bridgeport, CT)
 University of Delaware (Newark, DL)                              University of Delaware (Lewes, DL)
 Georgia Tech (Atlanta, GA)                                              Georgia Southern University (Statesboro, GA)
University of Georgia (Athens, GA)                                Georgia State University (Atlanta)
 University of Idaho (Moscow, ID)
 University of Chicago (Chicago, IL)                                Southern Illinois University (Carbondale, IL)
Northwestern University (Evanston, IL)                         Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL)
 Purdue University (Lafayette, IN)                                   University of Indiana (Bloomington)
Notre Dame University (Notre Dame, IN)
 Iowa State University (Ames, IA)                                     McPherson College (McPherson, KS)
                                                                                                University of Kansas (Lawrence, KS)    
Centre College (Danville KY)                                         Eastern Kentucky University (Richmond, KY)
University of Kentucky (Lexington, KY)
The Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD)                University of Maryland (College Park, MD)         
Salisbury State University (Maryland)                             NASA Goddard (Greenbelt, MD)
Carnegie Inst., Dept. Embryology (Baltimore, MD)          NIST (Gaithersburg, MD)
Army Research Lab                                                                 Space Telescope Science Institute
Harvard University (Cambridge, MA)                              University of Massachusetts (Amherst, MA)
Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA)               Schlumberger Research (Cambridge, MA)
Boston College (MA)                                                              MIT (Cambridge, MA)
Marine Biology Lab (Woods Hole, MA)
University of Michigan (Ann Arbor)                                 Michigan State University (East Lansing)
University of Minnesota (St. Paul, MN
University of Missouri (Kansas City, MO)                        Washington University (St. Louis, MO
University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH)                    Keene State College (Keene, NH)
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH)
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ)                               Montclair State University (Montclair, NJ)
Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ)                         Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
St. Johns College (Santa Fe, NM)                                       Los Alamos National Lab (Los Alamos, NM)
University of New Mexico (Albuquerque)                        Santa Fe Institute (NM)
State University of New York (Stony Brook, NY)              IBM Watson Res. Cen. (Yorktown Heights, NY)
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY)                                       The Century Club (New York, NY)
University of Buffalo (Buffalo, NY)                                  State University of New York (Cortland, NY)
Lamont-Doherty (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY)           American Museum of Natural History (NY, NY)  
RPI (Troy, NY)                                                                     Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (NY, NY)
Simons Foundation (NY, NY)                                          Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY)
Duke (Durham, NC)                                                          East Carolina University (Greenville, NC)
Elon College (Elon College, NC)                                    Appalachian State University (Boone NC)
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Denison University (Granville, OH)                                 The Ohio State University (Columbus, OH)
Wright State University (Dayton, OH)                             Case Western Reserve Univ (Cleveland, OH)
Miami University (Oxford, OH)
University of Oklahoma (Norman, OK)                           
Linfield College (McMinnville, OR)                                  Oregon State University (Corvalis, OR)
Portland State University (OR)
Pennsylvania State Univ. (University Park, PA)               University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA)
Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia                 LaSalle University (Philadelphia, PA)
University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA)                        Lafayette University (Easton, PA)
Carnegie-Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA)                   Franklin and Marshall Univ. (Lancaster, PA)      
Villanova University (Villanova, PA)                                Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA)
University of Rhode Island (Providence, RI)                   Brown University (Providence, RI)
Clemson University (Clemson, SC)                                 The Citadel (Charleston, SC)
University of Charleston (Charleston, SC)
Tennessee Technical University (Cookville, TN)              East Tennessee State Univ. (Johnson City, TN)
University of Tennessee, Knoxville                                University of Tennessee, Martin
Texas Tech (Lubbock, TX)                                            University of Texas (Austin, TX)
Trinity College (San Antonio, TX)                                   Petroleum Museum (Midland, TX
University of Utah, Salt Lake City                                   Science Computing Institute, Salt Lake City (UT)
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA)                           Mary Washington College (Fredericksburg, VA) Union Theological Seminary (Richmond, VA)                 
Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA)
Virginia Commonwealth University (Richmond, VA)         Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA)   
National Science Foundation (Ballston, VA)                   William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA)
Norwich University (Northfield, VT)                                 St. Mary’s College (Burlington, VT) 
Howard University (Washington, DC)                             Smithsonian Institution (Washington, DC)
Carnegie Institution (Washington, DC)                           Brookings Institution (Washington, DC)
National Academy of Sciences (Washington, DC)           Naval Research Laboratory (Washington, DC)
George Washington University (Washington, DC)          
University of Washington (Seattle, WA)                          University of Puget Sound (Tacoma, WA)
University of West Virginia (Morgantown, WV)                Marquette University (Milwaukee, WI)
University of Wyoming (Laramie, WY)
University of Melbourne (Australia)                                University of Sydney (Australia)
University of Vienna (Austria)                                        Austrian Academy of Sciences (Vienna)
Natural History Museum of Vienna (Austria)
McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada)          McGill University (Montreal, Quebec, Canada)  
Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto, Ontario, Canada)        University of British Columbia (Vancouver)
Institute for Geology and Geophysics (Beijing, China)     University of Shanghai (China)                                                   
University of Cambridge (England)                                University of Newcastle (England)
University of Oxford (England)                                       University of Liverpool (England)
Geological Society of London (England)
Institute de Physique du Globe (Paris, France)               Schlumberger Research (Paris, France)
Air Liquide Research (Paris, France)                              Sorbonne (Paris, France)
University of Kiel (Germany)                                          University of Greifswald (Germany)
University of Freiberg (Germany)                                   University of Bochum (Germany)
University of Muenster (Germany)                                  University of Cologne (Germany)
German Research Institute (Potsdam)                           University of Bremen (Germany)
University of Potsdam (Germany)
University of Groningen (Holland)                                  University of Utrecht (Holland)
Technical University (Budapest, Hungary)                      Eötvös University (Budapest, Hungary)             
University of Rome (Italy)                                               University of Florence (Italy)
Campiglia Maritima (Italy)                                              University of Milan (Italy
University of Tokyo (Japan)                                           Tohoku University (Sendai, Japan)
Tokyo Tech (Japan)
Agadir University, Morocco
University of Bergen (Norway)                                      
St. Petersburg State University (Russia)                         Institute of Mineralogy, Apatity (Russia)
St. Andrews University (Scotland)
Gwangju University, South Korea
Spanish Astrobiology Institute (Madrid)                          Palace Royale (Santandar, Spain)
University of Uppsala (Sweden)                                     University of Stockholm (Sweden)
Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences (Stockholm)


 Selected Television Appearances:
  • CNN, “Sonia Live”
  • CBS, “Nightwatch”
  • NBC, “The Today Show”
  • KDFW (Dallas, TX), “Point of View”
  • KHOU (Houston, TX), “AM Houston”
  • PBS, “Science Journal”
  • WGBH (Boston), “NOVA” (several episodes)
  • BBC (London), “Horizon”
  • IDEA TV (Brazil)
  • History Channel, “Modern Marvels” 
  • Maryland Public TV, “The Environment”                        
  • Spanish Public TV, “REDES”                                        
  • Discovery Science, “Sci-Fi Science”    
  •  Discover Channel, “Naked Science”                        
  •  National Geographic, “Origins”   Japan National Public Television

 Selected Radio Appearances (1-Hour Live Talk Shows):

  • NPR, “Science Friday”
  • Recurring hour-long appearances on Wisconsin Public Radio   
  • WAMU (Washington), “Diane Rehm Show” and “Mike Cuthburt Show”
  • KPRC (Houston), “Doug Johnson Show”
  • KLBJ (Austin, TX) “PM Show”
  • KING (Seattle), “Jim Altoff Show”
  • KABC (Los Angeles), “Michael Jackson Show”
  • KXLY (Seattle), “PM Show”
  • WNYC (New York), “New York & Company”
  • KNBR (San Francisco), “Leo LaPorte Show”
  • BBC (London)
  • WBZ (Boston), “Lovell Dyett Show”
  • KFI (Los Angeles), “Lora Cain Show”
  • KMOX (St. Louis), Morning show
  • KSDO (San Diego), “Roger Hedgecock Show”
  • WAMC (Albany, NY), “The Best of Our Knowledge”
  • WJNO (West Palm Beach, FL), “Jack Cole Show”
  • WKAR (Michigan Public Radio), “Carey Bernstein Show”
  • KNSS (Witchita, KS), “Morning Magazine”
  • Virginia Public Radio, “With Good Reason”
  • KDKA (Pittsburgh, PA), “Open Mike”


 Selected Taped Radio Spots:

  • NPR “All Things Considered,” “Weekend Edition”
  • CBS “Countdown to Tomorrow”
  • ABC “Chuck Taylor”
  • WKYS (Washington), “Sunday Morning Magazine”
  • KIKK (Houston), “Talkin Country”
  • Southern Baptist Radio, “Master Control”
  • KPLU (Seattle), “Morning Edition”
  • KMPS (Seattle), “Introspect”
  • KGW (Portland, OR), “Peter Wiseback Show”
  • KVMR (Nevada City CA), “Soundings” with Alan Stahler
  • National Public Radio, “All Things Considered”
  • Wisconsin Public Radio, “To the Best of Our Knowledge”
  • BBC Radio (London)
  • BBC World Service
  • Canadian Broadcast System
  • PBS, “Earth & Sky
  • Prof. Michio Kaku, “Explorations”

Selected articles on “Mineral Evolution” (Am.Min. 93, 1693-1720, 2008) and related topics

  • Minik Rosing (2008) “On the evolution of minerals.” Nature 456, 456-458.
  • Sid Perkins (2008) “As life evolves, minerals do too.” Science News, December 6, 2008, 10.
  • Phil Bernardelli (2008) “Earth’s minerals evolved, too.” ScienceNOW Daily News, Noember 14, 2008. (http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org)
  • Crisogono Vasconcelos and Judith McKenzie (2009) “The descent of minerals.” Science 323, 218-219.
  • Brian Fisher Johnson (2009) “Minerals take on a new life.” Earth, January 2009, 14-15.
  • Harvey Leifert (2009) “Rocky Road.” Natural History, February 2009, 14.
  • Science News (2009) News of the Year issue, “Minerals evolve too.” January 3, 2009, 26.
  • American Scientist (2009) “Rocks evolve too.” January-February 2009, 25.
  • Colin Nickerson (2009) “The blurry line between life, nonlife.” Boston Globe, January 12, 2009, A9.
  • Boris Bellanger (2009) “Mineraux sans la vie, il n’en existerait pas autant!” Science et Vie, March 2009, 102-104.
  • “Mineral evolution rocks world.” Carnegie Science, Spring 2009, 10-11.
  • Bradley, D.C. (2015) Mineral evolution and Earth history. American Mineralogist 100, 4-5.
  • Heaney, Peter J. (2016) Time’s arrow in the trees of life and minerals. American Mineralogist 101, 1027-1035.
  • Heaney, Peter J. (2017) Animal, vegetable, or mineral? Natural History, February 2017, 32-37.
  • Oleson, Timothy (2018) Data-driven discovery reveals Earth’s missing minerals. Earth, June 2018, 24-3

 


Selected articles on “Mineral Rarity” (Am.Min. 101, 1245-1251, 2016) and related topics.
 Press release resulted in more than 450 articles in 46 countries, 15 languages, >500 million hits

  • New Scientist (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals could hint at life on other planets.
  • Reuters (2016) For Valentine’s Day gift, forget diamonds, try ichnusaite.
  • Los Angeles Times (2016) Way beyond diamonds: A look at some of the rarest minerals in the world
  • Forbes (2016) The world’s rarest minerals are finally catalogued.
  • American Scientist (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals.
  • Alex Berezow (2016) A new way to understand the world’s rarest minerals. The Atlantic.
  • Huffington Post (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals give diamond a run for their money.
  • Christian Science Monitor (2016) What makes Earth unique? A few rare minerals say scientists.
  • International Business Times (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals categorized in new study.
  • ABC News, Australia (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals may provide key to understanding origin of life.
  • Peter Spinks (2016) World’s rarest minerals reveal Earth’s uniqueness. The Age, February 15.

 Selected articles on “Anthropocene mineralogy” (Am.Min. 102, 595-611, 2017) and related topics
Press release resulted in more than 350 articles in 49 countries, 17 languages, >600 million hits

  • Heaney, Peter J. (2017) Defining minerals in the age of humans. American Mineralogist 102.
  • Forbes (2017) Humanity sparked the creation of new minerals.
  • Christian Science Monitor (2017) Geologists find slew of manmade minerals, but no start to Anthropocene.
  • Science Times (2017) Human activity produced 208 new minerals.
  • Popular Science (2017) Is the Anthropocene a real thing?
  • Popular Mechanics (2017) Humanity has created thousands of artificial minerals.
  • Harvey, Chelsea (2017) Humans have caused an explosion of never-been-seen minerals all over the Earth. Washington Post
  • Cross, Ryan (2017) Minerals formed due to people’s activity may mark Anthropocene epoch. Chemical and Engineering News, 95.
  • New Scientist (2017) Rock solid evidence of Anthropocene seen in 208 minerals we made.
  • Reuters (2017) New minerals back idea of man-made epoch for Earth.
  • The Guardian (2017) Rock of ages: Impact of manmade crystals defining new geological epoch.
  • International Business Times (2017) Anthropocene: 208 crystals that don’t exist anywhere else in the universe.
  • Scientific American (2017) Thousands of Man-Made minerals—Another argument for the Anthropocene.
  • Washington Post (2017) Humans have caused an explosion of never-before-seen minerals.
  • CBC, Canada (2017) We’ve created 208 new minerals: Time for a new, Anthropocene epoch?

 


Selected articles on “Carbon Mineral Ecology” (Am.Min. 101, 889-906, 2016)

  • Perkins, Sid (2016) Rock hounds are on the hunt for new carbon minerals. Science News, October 4.
  • Oleson, Timothy (2018) Data-driven discovery reveals Earth’s missing minerals. Earth, June 2018, 24-31.

 


Selected articles on “Mineral Rarity” (Am.Min. 101, 1245-1251, 2016) and related topics.
Press release resulted in more than 450 articles in 46 countries, 15 languages, >500 million hits

  • New Scientist (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals could hint at life on other planets.
  • Reuters (2016) For Valentine’s Day gift, forget diamonds, try ichnusaite.
  • Los Angeles Times (2016) Way beyond diamonds: A look at some of the rarest minerals in the world
  • Forbes (2016) The world’s rarest minerals are finally catalogued.
  • American Scientist (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals.
  • Alex Berezow (2016) A new way to understand the world’s rarest minerals. The Atlantic.
  • Huffington Post (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals give diamond a run for their money.
  • Christian Science Monitor (2016) What makes Earth unique? A few rare minerals say scientists.
  • International Business Times (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals categorized in new study.
  • ABC News, Australia (2016) Earth’s rarest minerals may provide key to understanding origin of life.
  • Peter Spinks (2016) World’s rarest minerals reveal Earth’s uniqueness. The Age, February 15.

 


Selected articles on “Anthropocene mineralogy” (Am.Min. 102, 595-611, 2017) and related topics
Press release resulted in more than 350 articles in 49 countries, 17 languages, >600 million hits

  • Heaney, Peter J. (2017) Defining minerals in the age of humans. American Mineralogist 102.
  • Forbes (2017) Humanity sparked the creation of new minerals.
  • Christian Science Monitor (2017) Geologists find slew of manmade minerals, but no start to Anthropocene.
  • Science Times (2017) Human activity produced 208 new minerals.
  • Popular Science (2017) Is the Anthropocene a real thing?
  • Popular Mechanics (2017) Humanity has created thousands of artificial minerals.
  • Harvey, Chelsea (2017) Humans have caused an explosion of never-been-seen minerals all over the Earth. Washington Post
  • Cross, Ryan (2017) Minerals formed due to people’s activity may mark Anthropocene epoch. Chemical and Engineering News, 95.
  • New Scientist (2017) Rock solid evidence of Anthropocene seen in 208 minerals we made.
  • Reuters (2017) New minerals back idea of man-made epoch for Earth.
  • The Guardian (2017) Rock of ages: Impact of manmade crystals defining new geological epoch.
  • International Business Times (2017) Anthropocene: 208 crystals that don’t exist anywhere else in the universe.
  • Scientific American (2017) Thousands of Man-Made minerals—Another argument for the Anthropocene.
  • Washington Post (2017) Humans have caused an explosion of never-before-seen minerals.
  • CBC, Canada (2017) We’ve created 208 new minerals: Time for a new, Anthropocene epoch? 

Selected articles on “Carbon Mineral Ecology” (Am.Min. 101, 889-906, 2016)

  • Perkins, Sid (2016) Rock hounds are on the hunt for new carbon minerals. Science News, October 4.
  • Oleson, Timothy (2018) Data-driven discovery reveals Earth’s missing minerals. Earth, June 2018, 24-31.