Robert M. Hazen | Geophysical Laboratory

Music Files

 

 

Bach, Cantata #5 “Wo sol lich fleihen hin?” performed by the Cantata Singers, Sanders Theater, Harvard University, December 5, 1973. Philip Kelsey, conductor. Susan Larson, soprano; Dianna Fortunato, alto; Karl Dan Sorenson, tenor; David Evitts, bass. The seven movements are (1) chorus, (2) bass recit, (3) tenor aria with viola, (4) contralto recit with oboe, (5) bass aria with trumpet, (6) soprano recit; (7) chorale. We did Bach Cantata #77 on the same program. (21’55”) [play]

 

Bach, Cantata #51, final “Alleluia”: performed October 12, 2002 at my Mom’s memorial service at the Pacific Palisades Presbyterian Church, Pacific Palisades, California. Frances Young, soprano; Maria Newman, violin; Rosemary Hyler Ritter, continuo; Sara Parkins, violin; Sebastian Toettcher, cello. (2’35”) [play]

 

Purcell Sonata in D, movement 3: performed October 12, 2002 at my Mom’s memorial service at the Pacific Palisades Presbyterian Church, California. John Steele Ritter, organist. [play]

 

Bach, Cantata #76, opening chorus. Performed by Emmanuel Music. Craig Smith, conductor. (4’40”) [play]

 

Bach, Cantata #76, All. Performed by Emmanuel Music on . Craig Smith, conductor. (38’40”) [play]

 

Bach, Cantata #126, opening chorus. Performed by Emmanuel Music on February 23, 2003. Criag Smith conducting. (2’35”) [play]

 

Bach, Cantata #190, opening chorus “Singet dem Herren ein neuse Lied”, performed by the Washington Bach Consort on Tuesday, February 4, 2003, at the Church of the Epiphany, Washington, DC. Stan Curtis, Bob Birch and Bob Hazen, trumpets. Riley Lewis conducting. (5’20”) [play]

  

Joseph Forestier’s “Fantasie Brilliante” (c.1842): Performed at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, January 25, 1992, on my Washington Chamber Symphony recital. That night we had a horrible slushy snow storm and I almost had an accident getting to the museum. Many people who bought tickets didn’t show, so they sold them at the door, filled the house, and ended up selling more tickets than seats! The great pianist was Dale Anthony, who died of AIDS a few years later. This “Fantasie” was one of the first pieces ever written for valved brass and keyboard, and was one of each such solos I discovered bound together in an old Parisian volume. They are described in my article: Hazen, R. M. (1995) Parisian cornet solos of the 1830s and 1840s: The earliest solo literature for valved brass and piano. International Trumpet Guild Journal May 1995, 34-38. Other pieces on the recital included concertos by Telemann and Haydn, the Purcell Sonata, and the Saint-Saens “Septet” Op. 14 with members of the Washington Chamber Symphony.  [play]

 

Telemann “Concerto in D for Oboe, Trumpet, Strings and Continuo” was performed on March 2, 1990, with the Washington Chamber Symphony, Steven Simon conducting and harpsichord, at the Terrace Theater of the Kennedy Center in Washington. Robert Hazen, trumpet; Phyllis Lanier, oboe; Haesoon Haen and Mary Price, violins.(26’40”) [play]

 

Vejvanowsky, “Concerto for Symphony Orchestra” as performed by the Washington Chamber Symphony, September 16, 1987, at the Terrace Theater of the Kennedy Center in Washington. Trumpets include Robert Hazen, Dennis Edelbrock and Dan Smith. (12’25”)  [play]

 

Saint-Saens "Septet", January 25, 1992. [play]